?" data-webShareText="NaF(aq) + HCl(aq) --> ?" data-webShareUrl="https://www.usmam.org/topic/17923-nafaq-hclaq/">More sharing options...
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woelen


Posted march 29, 2006

woelen

Primate senior Members 18
Posted march 29, 2006

The HF will certainly not appear as a gas. It will certainly be dissolved in the water. When the liquid is heated, it will certainly not be moved off together the pure gas. HF creates an azeotrope v water. When the systems is dilute, then first water will certainly be driven away and when the concentration of the HF has actually risen to the azeotropic value, then a consistent ratio mix that HF and also H2O is boiled away.

You are watching: Sodium fluoride and hydrochloric acid net ionic equation

 

Pure HF is borderline in between gas an liquid. The boils simply under 20C at typical atmospheric pressure.


Link to commentShare on other sites ?" data-webShareText="The HF will certainly not appear as a gas. It will be liquified in the water. When the fluid is heated, it will not be thrust off as the pure gas. HF forms an azeotrope through water. As soon as the systems is dilute, then very first water will certainly be propelled away and when the concentration of the HF has actually risen to the azeotropic value, climate a continuous ratio mix of HF and H2O is boiled away. Pure HF is borderline in between gas one liquid. That boils just under 20C at typical atmospheric pressure. " data-webShareUrl="https://www.usmam.org/topic/17923-nafaq-hclaq/?do=findComment&comment=253628">More share options...
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RyanJ


Posted in march 29, 2006

RyanJ

Primate an elderly Members 34
Posted march 29, 2006
Wow.

 

I think Hydrogen Flouride would be liquid. (supposing your equation is correct).

 

But wouldn"t the equation look like this:

 

2NaF (aq) + 2HCl (aq) -> 2NaCl(aq) + H2(g) + 2F(l)

 

I"m fairly sure the this reaction would offer off hydrogen gas and also that flourine would certainly be deposited together a liquid.


 

Not at every

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woelen





Wow.

 

I think Hydrogen Flouride would be liquid. (supposing her equation is correct).

See more: Professor Layton And The Curios Village Answers, 001 Where'S The Town

 

But wouldn"t the equation look like this:

 

2NaF (aq) + 2HCl (aq) -> 2NaCl(aq) + H2(g) + 2F(l)

 

I"m quute sure that this reaction would offer off hydrogen gas and that flourine would certainly be deposited together a liquid.




budullewraagh







woelen







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RyanJ





I was thinking it to be a basic ionic swap - but I couldn"t acquire my head ring the HF as being a product of an ionic reaction (since that is covalent) ns guess i haven"t learnt chemistry to the degree.